7 Academic Benefits Of Effective Classroom Management

7 Academic Benefits Of Effective Classroom Management

Classroom management has always taken a backseat. Now it’s sitting in the trunk.

Since the (official) end of the pandemic, behavior standards have fallen down a mine shaft and have yet to hit bottom.

It’s maddening.

In recent articles, I’ve covered why this is so devastating to student behavior, motivation, and mental health.

Today, I want to talk about learning. Along with a teacher’s expert knowledge of content, classroom management has the greatest impact on academic progress.

What follows are seven benefits of effective classroom management that can’t be found in any other strategy, method, or approach to learning.

1. Time on task

In an exceptionally well-managed classroom, students are focused and working for hundreds of more hours than a typical classroom.

The result is that more learning is taking place. It’s a simple formula. And the difference in outcomes—be it reading, writing, or any other academic skill and ability—is staggering.

2. Culture

Effective classroom management allows for a culture of purpose, wherein learning is viewed as sacred and the whole point of being in class.

The truth is, in standard classrooms many students don’t even know why they’re there, what their role and purpose is, or the seriousness of their education and its impact on their future.

3. Focus

When interruptions are eliminated, and any threat of bullying and being made fun of is vanquished, students can relax and focus on the goals and objectives they’re given.

They can get lost in the intrinsic joy of learning when they’re free from phones, social media, behavior disruptions, disrespect, chaos, and trying to be cool.

4. Consistency

It takes awhile for students to get into the groove of focused, inspired learning. It takes day after day of calm, consistent peace, trust in their teacher, and compelling lessons.

Developing the habits of successful students take a wholesale change in thinking that can only happen in a well-behaved, counter-culture environment where learning comes first.

5. Challenge

You can’t adequately challenge students without effective classroom management. You can’t continue to push and ask for more if you’re putting out fires and being interrupted.

Just getting through the day—which is where many teachers find themselves—will not get students from A to B and beyond. It will only leave them further behind.

6. Maturity

A well-managed class has a maturity level that grows throughout a school year to two years greater than the typical class next door. This has profound implications on learning.

With seriousness of purpose and commitment, not only will students look and act different, but their progress accelerates, often doubling compared to the previous month—because they’re ready to handle more and more.

7. Success

Effective classroom management entails teaching students how to behave in a way that is best for them and their learning. It takes clarity, detail, demonstrability, and practice.

It takes guiding students to behavioral success—no matter who they are or their problems of the past. This success, then, in doing things the right way, transfers to everything they do.

One Thing

This article wasn’t written in a vacuum.

If you have questions about how to create a well-behaved classroom no matter what grade you teach or where, please spend time on our website. There are now nearly 700 articles in the archive (sidebar at right).

We also have seven books and three e-guides available (also at right) and dozens of videos, all explaining exactly what to do.

In the meantime, if you do just this one thing, if you commit to becoming an expert in classroom management, which is far easier than most teachers think, it will have a monumental impact on your students.

And not just their behavior.

Test scores, reading levels, writing and math abilities, work habits . . . you name it. All indicators of academic growth will skyrocket because of the undeniable, unstoppable benefits listed above.

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